Religion Department

"Quote of the Day"

Dartmouth Now chose a quote from Professor Randall Balmer's Valley News op-ed article, "Why I Testified for Fred Phelps" as its "Quote of the Day": "I remember Phelps for having confronted me with an ethical dilemma that haunts me to this day," says Professor Randall Balmer about the notorious pastor Fred Phelps of Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas.

Welcome Professor Robert Baum

Professor Robert Baum was featured in a recent Dartmouth Now article highlighing some of the new scholars who have joined Dartmouth's faculty this academic year. Professor Baum has a joint appointment with the Religion Department and the African and African-American Studies program, specializing in African religions. Professor Baum is completing a book on the history of Diola women's prophetic movements.

Catharine Randall on "The Wisdom of Animals"

Senior Lecturer Catharine Randall's latest book, The Wisdom of Animals: Creatureliness in Early Modern French Spirituality, has just been published by the University of Notre Dame Press. Tom Conley, Abbot Lawrence Lowell Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard, comments, “Here is a book that breathes and inspires: terse and compelling, every page written with flair and force, The Wisdom of Animals reaches into the past to remind us that we are animals and that we must commit our faith to the world that, by no casual miracle, it is a gift for us to inhabit."

Professor Randall Balmer's new book on President Jimmy Carter

Professor Randall Balmer's new book, Redeemer: The Life of Jimmy Carter, has just been published by Basic Books. The Spring, 2014, issue of "Here in Hanover" magazine featured an article about it, New Hampshire Public Radio interviewed Professor Balmer about it, and it's just been reviewed in the New York Times Book Review.

Professor Christopher MacEvitt named ACLS Fellow

Professor Christopher MacEvitt has been awarded a Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. As a Burkhardt Fellow, he will spend the 2015-16 academic year at the American Academy in Rome, working on a book-length study of the fourteenth-century Mediterranean from two competing perspectives of Jerusalem, “Jerusalem Lost: the Holy Land and Islam in Christian Memory.” The first preserved the memory of Jerusalem among the Latin individuals and ecclesiastical institutions that fled from the Holy Land before the Mamluk conquest in 1291. The second perspective was that of western Europeans in the same era who re-imagined the Holy Land through local recreations, such as Nativity scenes and the Holy House of Loreto, and through the Franciscan presence in the Holy Land itself, an image that left little place for the crusader kingdom that had flourished for two centuries.

New Summer Term Course!

REL 19 (10A) When People Were Gods (Instructor: Visiting Edinburgh Professor Matthew Novenson)
In ancient religions, the boundary between gods and human beings was penetrable. This was true not only for Greek and Romans, but in different ways for Jews and Christians, as well. In this class we will read ancient accounts of Moses, Julius Caesar, Jesus of Nazareth, and other people who became gods. We will also consider views of the nature of the gods from the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and contemporary Graeco-Roman texts. Open to all classes.

  

 

 

 

 

 

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