News & Events

  • Thursday, February 20, 2020
    4:30pm
    Filene Auditorium

    Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. He is the current president of the American Academy of Religion. His books on religion and...

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  • Michelle Wang (Associate Professor, Department of Art & Art History, Georgetown)
    "Dunhuang: Buddhist Art at the Crossroads of Asia"

    Thursday, January 23
    4:30pm
    41 Haldeman Hall
    Free & open to all. Reception follows

  • If you would have told me when I entered Dartmouth that 20 years after graduation I would be an Orthodox Jewish Rabbi living in Israel, working as an experiential educator and teaching the History and Religion of Israel toteens, I would have thought that you were crazy! But that is exactly where my circuitous path has taken me.

    My first Religion class with Susan Ackerman my Freshman Fall (Religion 4, The Religion of Israel), profoundly changed the path of my life. I fell in love with...

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  • Religion professor Tim Baker, who also serves as Assistant Dean of the Faculty and faculty advisor for the Humanities Living and Learning Center, was recently interviewed by The Dartmouth (10-30-19) about his current research and interests, in particular how people seek to become like God, ideas of connection and compassion among members of a community, and sacred spaces. Read the full interview...

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  • Fred Berthold Jr. '45, Preston Kelsey Professor of Religion, Emeritus, passed away on Wednesday, September 18, 2019, at Kendal at Hanover. Fred was born in Webster Groves, Missouri. He completed his undergraduate degree at Dartmouth in 1944 (a year early) and received his PhD in Religion from the University of Chicago. He joined the faculty of Dartmouth in 1949 and became the first dean of the William Jewett Tucker Foundation (1957-1962). He was appointed the first Preston H. Kelsey...

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  • This academic year, Japanese scholar Emily Simpson will teach the following courses:

    • In 19F, REL 19.29 (12) Women and Religion in Japan
    • In 20W, REL 19.31 (2) Religions of Japan
    • In 20S, REL 19.32 (10) Shinto: Foundations, Festivals, & Fox Shrines

    Prof. Simpson earned her B.A. from Vassar College and both her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Santa Barbara in East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies. She has also studied at...

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  • When I arrived at Dartmouth in September 1980 I had spent my childhood attending Mass and catechism classes at our local Catholic church.  I was intending to major in History, but an upper classman suggested I take a Religion class as the program had a great reputation.  Freshman Fall I took the Intro survey class (Religion 1) and it turned me on my head.  It lead me to ask questions of things I had never really looked at.  I suddenly became conscious of the water I had been swimming in all...

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  • When I entered Dartmouth, I thought I was going to be an Engineering Physics major and go on to live the life of, well, Dilbert.  But being in an academic environment like Dartmouth changed my perspective.  I realized that if I only pursued the academic areas in which I was already skilled, I would become too linear a thinker and ultimately, too one dimensional a person.  I began complementing my math and science studies with a variety of other courses (Art History, History, Psychology,...

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  • I can't tell you how many times in my adult life I have received odd looks from people when I tell them I majored in Religion at Dartmouth. People just don't expect it and seem to have trouble understanding it beyond the typical "did you want to be a minister/pastor/priest?" Despite those awkward moments I wouldn't change my decision on my major for anything. I have found that my Dartmouth education and my Religion major have served me well in my life, both professionally and personally....

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  • I recall thinking, as an undergrad, that Religion was interesting and unique because it was a prism through which I could explore the liberal arts broadly. It provided a coherent excuse to take courses related to Philosophy, Anthropology, History, and Sociology, all under one roof. I now have an MBA and a JD, and I work in biotechnology with MDs and PhDs---all a far cry from Mahayana Buddhism or Spinoza--but I still find myself thinking about Turner's "Betwixt and Between," among many other...

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