Religion Department

Andrew Nalani '16 speaks at Gates Foundation Goalkeepers Event

Religion major Andrew Nalani '16 spoke at a September 25, 2018, Gates Foundation Goalkeepers Event. Nalani, originally from Uganda, spoke about the transformative role of education at an event hosted by the foundation's Goalkeepers campaign and timed to coincide with the 2018 U.N. General Assembly. Read more about Nalani in Dartmouth Alumni News. You can also view his talk here (he comes onstage at about 1 hour, 37 minutes).

Gil Raz awarded Luce Foundation grant

Gil Raz, Associate Professor of Religion, has received a $350,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation for a four-year project entitled Advancing Daoism: Epigraphic and Archeological Materials as Sources for Daoist Lived Religion. In cooperation with several Chinese partners, this collaborative project examines religious artifacts such as statues, stone inscriptions, cave shrines, and grave goods in order to research the history of traditional Chinese religion, especially Daoism, between the 5th and 16th centuries. For more about Professor Raz, please also see his profile webpage: https://religion.dartmouth.edu/people/gil-raz

"Why I Love Being a Religion Major"

Julianna Thomson '20 loves being a Religion major because of the small class sizes, Foreign Study Program in Edinburgh, Scotland, and learning about different world views. Read her profile on the Undergraduate Admissions Office's blog. What are the requirements for a Religion major or minor? Check out the Religion website here - and check out our current and upcoming course offerings here.

Devin Singh awarded Luce grant

Assistant Professor of Religion Devin Singh has been awarded a Luce Foundation-funded grant through the Institute of Buddhist Studies for an interreligious and interdisciplinary project around the impact of technology on self and society. Singh's project is "Decentered Sovereignties and Spectral Transactions: Cryptocurrency, Public Theology, and the Ethics of Presence," for inclusion in the Public Theologies of Technology and Presence grants and research initiative. Read more about his project here, and more about the Institute of Buddhist Studies' initiative here. He is teaching a course on God & Money (Rel. 11.01) at Dartmouth this Summer Term, and will be teaching Rel. 74.13, Religion and the Rise of Capitalism, in the Fall 2018 Term.

Faculty Search: Assistant Professor of Religion

The Department of Religion at Dartmouth College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level in Indigenous Religions of the Americas, the South Pacific, the Caribbean, or Australia, which may include African diasporic traditions in these regions. Appointment to begin as early as July 1, 2019. Disciplinary and historical specializations are open, but the ideal candidate’s research will demonstrate a substantive focus upon religion, thorough grounding in both theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion, ability to work in the relevant primary languages, and expertise in ethnographic and/or fieldwork approaches (if appropriate).

Reiko Ohnuma new Religion Department Chair

Professor of Religion Reiko Ohnuma has just been named Chair of the Dartmouth Department of Religion, effective July 1, 2018. Prof. Ohnuma is a specialist in the Buddhist traditions of South Asia (with a particular focus on narrative literature, hagiography, and the role and imagery of women), but also teaches courses on Hinduism. She holds a B.A. from the University of California (Berkeley) and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). She is the author of Head, Eyes, Flesh, and Blood: Giving Away the Body in Indian Buddhist Literature (Columbia University Press, 2007); Ties That Bind: Maternal Imagery and Discourse in Indian Buddhism (Oxford University Press, 2012); and Unfortunate Destiny: Animals in the Indian Buddhist Imagination (Oxford University Press, 2017). She will be teaching Rel. 41.03, “Women, Monasticism, & Buddhism” (identical to WGSS 44.07), in Winter Term, 2019. (Professor Ohnuma's key to building a successful writing practice? Yoga!

"Where Are All The Women In Jewish Studies?"

"Where Are All The Women In Jewish Studies?" ask Susannah Heschel (Chair of Dartmouth's Jewish Studies Program as well as Professor of Religion here) and Sarah Imhoff (Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and of Religious Studies at Indiana University) in their July 3, 2018, Forward article by that title, which explores gender bias in academia, publishing, professional organizations, and foundations in the field and urges leaders in the field to consider the implications: "By not including women scholars, you are deliberately distorting the state of the field, narrowing the range of knowledge and interpretation, and excluding important areas of research and insight. To include women means not simply the presence of female bodies, but of great minds, important experiences and points of view that enhance the quality of scholarship. The answer: We are here. Listen to us."

Randall Balmer on the religious right's concern about family values

Randall Balmer observed, in Elizabeth Dias' 6-20-18 New York Times article, "Evangelical Leaders Lament Border Separations, but Stand Behind Trump," that "The persistence of evangelical support for Trump, both his personal behavior and now his immigrations policies, finally lays to rest the illusion that the religious right was ever concerned about 'family values.'" (Read, too, Professor Balmer's opinion piece on the subject in the 6-24-18 Valley News, "Jeff Sessions and the Ruse of Selective Liberalism." Login may be required.)

Pages