"Speak Out Against Islamophobia"

Professor Susannah Heschel and two other prominent academics spoke out his week at Boston University, urging students to counter anti-Islam bigotry in the wake of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's controversial call to bar Muslims from entering the country, reports The Boston Globe. Professor Heschel told the crowd that gathered on the university campus that "it's not Islam that makes somebody decide, 'I want to kill someone.' It doesn't work that way."

Coming Out as Christian

"You'd be surprised how many conversations I start by wearing a cross and a Pride bracelet," observes Religion major Ethan Falleur '16, in a December 9, 2015, Huffington Post article, "Coming Out as Christian." "In the three years since I came out publicly as a gay man, I've gotten rather used to casually working my sexuality into conversations with people in the first few times I meet them." "What's harder, though," he adds, "is coming out as Christian. I'm not at all ashamed of either piece of my identity, but people's perceptions of Christians at my über-secular, Ivy League college are somewhat more fraught than their perceptions of anyone who falls under the LGBTQIA+ umbrella."

West Africa's Women of God

Professor Robert Baum's new book, West Africa's Women of God: Alinesitoué and the Diola Prophetic Tradition, just published by Indiana University Press, examines the history of direct revelation from Emitai, the Supreme Being, which has been central to the Diola religion from before European colonization to the present day. He charts the evolution of this movement from its origins as an exclusively male tradition to one that is largely female, and traces the response of Diola to the distinct challenges presented by conquest, colonial rule, and the post-colonial era. Looking specifically at the work of the most famous Diola woman prophet, Alinesitoué, Baum addresses the history of prophecy in West Africa and its impact on colonialism, the development of local religious traditions, and the role of women in religious communities.

 

 

 

A Scottish Thanksgiving

Dartmouth Now's recent article, "Far-Flung Thanksgiving: Off-Campus Programs Celebrate," includes a description of how the Religion and Philosophy FSPs - led by Religion Professor Kevin Reinhart and Philosophy Professor Susan Brison and both held at the University of Edinburgh this term - are combining forces to celebrate Thanksgiving this year. Their Thanksgiving dinner, which will include turkey with all the fixings as well as vegetarian haggis, will be hosted in the home of a Dartmouth alum from the Class of 1974 who teaches at the university. One of the students on the Religion FSP comments, "The Dartmouth network never ceases to amaze me."

Religion in the Kitchen

Elizabeth Pérez' new book, Religion in the Kitchen: Cooking, Talking, and the Making of Black Atlantic Traditions, will be published by New York University Press in January, 2016. In the book, which will be the subject of a roundtable discussion at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Prof. Pérez takes an intersectional approach to micropractices of cooking and talking in the intimate space of one, predominantly African-American community's kitchen, arguing that they season practitioners into gendered and racialized forms of subjectivity.

New Religion Department Faculty

This fall, the Religion Department will be welcoming two new faculty members, Zahra Ayubi and Devin Singh.

Zahra Ayubi, who comes to us from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and who will be teaching Religion 8 (Introduction to Islam) and Religion 26 (Islam in America) in Fall Term, has focussed her research on women and gender in prescriptive discourses and ethical thought in both pre-modern and modern Islam. Her scholarship is a feminist engagement with the Islamic intellectual tradition that seeks to advance understandings of the ways that gender is constructed in Islamic philosophy and operates in historical and contemporary transnational Muslim communities. At Dartmouth, she also teaches courses in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program.

Professor Susannah Heschel on the Massacre in Charleston

 “When are we going to have reparation—for slavery, for Jim Crow, for the new Jim Crow? Unless you give back, there is no repentance for you,” says Susannah Heschel, Professor of Religion and Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies, in a recent panel discussion on MSNBC.

Professor Randall Balmer on presidential candidate Mike Huckabee

Dartmouth Now reports that in a Los Angeles Tmes opinion piece, Professor Randall Balmer says that Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is employing rhetoric that casts members of the religious right as victims of intolerance who are scorned for what they believe, and could even be jailed for it. Balmer writes, "Whereas a candidate such as Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky worries about personal liberties, Huckabee warns about religious persecution. 'I came to New Hampshire to announce that I will fight for your right to be left alone,' Paul declared at the beginning of his campaign." Professor Balmer will be teaching a class in "Religion, Politics, and the Presidency" (REL 62) in the Fall 2015 Term.

Dartmouth's Geneva Bibles

Abby Thornburg '15, who is working on an independent study project with Religion Professor Susan Ackerman this term, has mounted a small exhibit in Rauner Library focused on her research topic, Dartmouth's Geneva Bibles. You can see a photo, and read Abby's blog post here -- http://raunerlibrary.blogspot.com/2015/05/the-geneva-bible.html -- and we'd also advise a stop by Rauner to see the exhibit as well: Abby's done a great job in putting it together! It's on the ground floor, just inside the entrance and to the right. Enjoy!

Philosophy of Religion and Ethics at Dartmouth

Philosophy of Religion and Ethics at Dartmouth: Thinking with Nancy K. Frankenberry and Ronald M. Green

Saturday, May 30, 2015
041 Haldeman Hall
Free & open to all

This one-day symposium marks the retirement of Nancy Frankenberry and Ronald Green. The symposium focuses on Nancy and Ron’s nationally recognized work in the fields of philosophy of religion and ethics. Robert Neville (Boston University) and Terry Godlove (Hofstra) will engage with Nancy’s work, and Stephen Palmquist (Hong Kong Baptist University) and Karen Lebacqz (Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley/Pacific School of Religion) will examine Ron’s. These presentations will be followed by responses by both professors.

Program Schedule

8:30am                 Coffee and morning pastries

9:00am                 Welcome

  • Adrian Randolph, Associate Dean, Arts & Humanities, Dartmouth College
  • Randall Balmer, Chair, Religion Department
  • Susan Ackerman, Preston H. Kelsey Professor of Religion

  9:15-10:15am     

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