Devin Singh

Greed & God

Why is money so important to us? In his recent TED-type talk, "Greed and God," in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, Prof. Devin Singh points to Christianity for an explanation. From the start, he claims, Christian thinkers have connected ideas about God to economic concepts. In doing so, money gained an important, because godly, status. Watch the video of his talk here.

Devin Singh awarded Luce grant

Assistant Professor of Religion Devin Singh has been awarded a Luce Foundation-funded grant through the Institute of Buddhist Studies for an interreligious and interdisciplinary project around the impact of technology on self and society. Singh's project is "Decentered Sovereignties and Spectral Transactions: Cryptocurrency, Public Theology, and the Ethics of Presence," for inclusion in the Public Theologies of Technology and Presence grants and research initiative. Read more about his project here, and more about the Institute of Buddhist Studies' initiative here. He is teaching a course on God & Money (Rel. 11.01) at Dartmouth this Summer Term, and will be teaching Rel. 74.13, Religion and the Rise of Capitalism, in the Fall 2018 Term.

Christian Theology's Economy of Conquest

In an article for the Stanford University Press blog, Assistant Professor of Religion Devin Singh explores Martin Luther King Jr.'s "challenge to the American church's capitalist God of war" and observes that, "Ensconced in the theologies, liturgies, and paeans of praise inherited by Christian communities over the centuries was a portrait of God who was, among many things, a conquering economist and savvy resource manager." Singh's new book, Divine Currency: The Theological Power of Money in the West (Stanford Univ. Pr.) was just published.

"Money--Flat, Broad, and Deep"

Assistant Professor of Religion Devin Singh's article, "Money--Flat, Broad, and Deep," has been published in The Immanent Frame: Secularism, Religion, and the Public Sphere, which publishes interdisciplinary perspectives on religion, secularism, and the public sphere. Singh is currently on leave for the '17-'18 academic year, supported by a First Book Grant from the Louisville Institute, and will be a visiting scholar at Harvard Divinity School's Center for the Study of World Religions.

Devin Singh awarded First Book Grant by Louisville Institute

Assistant Professor Devin Singh has been awarded a First Book Grant by The Louisville Institute, which supports scholars from underrepresented communities whose project contributes to the study of Christianity in North America. Singh will be granted a one-year faculty leave to complete work on his first book, God's Coin: Theology, Politics, and Monetary Economy. Singh's project explores the monetary logic at work in Christian doctrine and, as such, contributes to understandings of the American prosperity gospel, Christian support of corporate America, and American constructive theology that critiques the economy. The Louisville Institute is funded by the Religion Division of the Lilly Endowment and is based at the Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, Louisville, KY.

 

I Read, Therefore I Think

"What place do theological and confessionally religious texts have in a secular, private liberal arts curriculum?" asks Religion Professor Devin Singh in his feature article, "I Read, Therefore I Think," in the September-October, 2016, issue of the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. Singh believes that including theology in the liberal arts curriculum can help foster generous and empathetic reading, helps disrupt the myth of academic objectivity, provides unique insights into Western culture and society, projects alternative possible worlds, and invites critical analysis. "Even as theology helped shape humanistic perspectives in the Western university and provided a framework for the liberal arts," he concludes, "its presence continues to help prepare students to analyze and respond to the full scope of human experience in the world today."

New Religion Faculty

Thirty-six scholars - including two new Religion Department faculty - joined the Dartmouth faculty in 2016. Read more about Professors Zahra Ayubi, whose research is on women and gender in prescriptive discourses and ethical thought in both pre-modern and modern Islam and also teaches in the Women and Sexuality Studies Program, and Devin Singh, who studies how the framework of religion is helpful in understanding the influence of money in economy and society, in Dartmouth Now.

The Panama Papers and the Ritual of Confession

In his op-ed article in Religion Now, Professor Devin Singh notes that "the Panama Papers caught some of the most powerful people on the globe in the act of self-dealing. Now the public wants the guilty to come clean, step into the light, and confess their financial misdeeds." But, Singh observes, "While such confession might be an important public ritual, there are reasons to believe that confession won't make the sins disappear and they'll likely happen again."

Pages