Devin Singh awarded Luce grant

Assistant Professor of Religion Devin Singh has been awarded a Luce Foundation-funded grant through the Institute of Buddhist Studies for an interreligious and interdisciplinary project around the impact of technology on self and society. Singh's project is "Decentered Sovereignties and Spectral Transactions: Cryptocurrency, Public Theology, and the Ethics of Presence," for inclusion in the Public Theologies of Technology and Presence grants and research initiative. Read more about his project here, and more about the Institute of Buddhist Studies' initiative here. He is teaching a course on God & Money (Rel. 11.01) at Dartmouth this Summer Term, and will be teaching Rel. 74.13, Religion and the Rise of Capitalism, in the Fall 2018 Term.

Faculty Search: Assistant Professor of Religion

The Department of Religion at Dartmouth College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level in Indigenous Religions of the Americas, the South Pacific, the Caribbean, or Australia, which may include African diasporic traditions in these regions. Appointment to begin as early as July 1, 2019. Disciplinary and historical specializations are open, but the ideal candidate’s research will demonstrate a substantive focus upon religion, thorough grounding in both theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion, ability to work in the relevant primary languages, and expertise in ethnographic and/or fieldwork approaches (if appropriate).

Reiko Ohnuma new Religion Department Chair

Professor of Religion Reiko Ohnuma has just been named Chair of the Dartmouth Department of Religion, effective July 1, 2018. Prof. Ohnuma is a specialist in the Buddhist traditions of South Asia (with a particular focus on narrative literature, hagiography, and the role and imagery of women), but also teaches courses on Hinduism. She holds a B.A. from the University of California (Berkeley) and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). She is the author of Head, Eyes, Flesh, and Blood: Giving Away the Body in Indian Buddhist Literature (Columbia University Press, 2007); Ties That Bind: Maternal Imagery and Discourse in Indian Buddhism (Oxford University Press, 2012); and Unfortunate Destiny: Animals in the Indian Buddhist Imagination (Oxford University Press, 2017). She will be teaching Rel. 41.03, “Women, Monasticism, & Buddhism” (identical to WGSS 44.07), in Winter Term, 2019. (Professor Ohnuma's key to building a successful writing practice? Yoga!

"Where Are All The Women In Jewish Studies?"

"Where Are All The Women In Jewish Studies?" ask Susannah Heschel (Chair of Dartmouth's Jewish Studies Program as well as Professor of Religion here) and Sarah Imhoff (Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and of Religious Studies at Indiana University) in their July 3, 2018, Forward article by that title, which explores gender bias in academia, publishing, professional organizations, and foundations in the field and urges leaders in the field to consider the implications: "By not including women scholars, you are deliberately distorting the state of the field, narrowing the range of knowledge and interpretation, and excluding important areas of research and insight. To include women means not simply the presence of female bodies, but of great minds, important experiences and points of view that enhance the quality of scholarship. The answer: We are here. Listen to us."

Professor Ayubi awarded New Directions in Humanities Scholarship

Assistant Professor of Religion Zahra Ayubi has just been awarded a New Directions in Humanities Scholarship, a new program of the Office of the Associate Dean for Arts and Humanities with funding from the Office of the President that encourages faculty in the arts and humanities to pursue projects outside their primary fields of expertise. Professor Ayubi will be studying contemporary gender ethics in Muslim communities and how ontological understandings of women's bodies affect medical decision-making in a traditionally male-oriented religious context. “Bioethics is not my field," she says, "yet I find that the precarious situation of patients in tough medical circumstances that require consideration of religion and bioethics is telling of deep underlying philosophical ideas—in Muslim traditions specifically—about the nature of women’s humanity.” Read more about the grant in Dartmouth News.

"Unfortunate Destiny: Animals in the Indian Buddhist Imagination"

Professor Reiko Ohnuma‘s Unfortunate Destiny: Animals in the Indian Buddhist Imagination (Oxford University Press, 2017) is "a masterful treatment of animals in Indian Buddhist literature," comments Natasha Heller, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, in her podcast interview with Professor Ohuma in New Books Network. "Although they are lower than humans in the paths of rebirth, stories about animals show them as virtuous and generous—and often the victim of human failings. In the life stories of the Buddha, animals serve as 'doubles,' thereby adding nuance and complexity to various episodes in the Buddha’s life.

New visiting professor: Kijan Bloomfield

Kijan Bloomfield is a doctoral candidate in the Religion, Ethics, and Politics subfield at Princeton. Her reearch areas include African American religious thought, religion in the African Diaspora, global pentecostalism, and Caribbean philosophy. Her Ph.D. dissertion is an interdisciplinary project that explores the role of religious ethics in the history of social change in Jamaica from the late 19th century to the present. She is here at Dartmouth this Spring Term to teach Religion 19.25, Religions of the Caribbean (taught at the 11 hour), and Religion 19.26, Global Pentecostalism (10A). Both courses are open to all students. (Course syllabi may be viewed here.)

Susan Ackerman receives award for "outstanding teaching of undergraduates"

Congratulations to Susan Ackerman '80, Preston H. Kelsey Professor in Religion, who was just presented with the Elizabeth Howland Hand-Otis Norton Pierce Award for a Faculty Member Who is an Outstanding Teacher of Undergraduates by the Faculty of Arts & Sciences. Read more here.

Zahra Ayubi receives Dean of the Faculty Mentoring Award

Assistant Professor of Religion Zahra Ayubi was recently honored with a Dean of the Faculty Mentoring Award for 2016-2017 for her outstanding work as a mentor of Dartmouth students. The award is funded and supported by the Provost and the Mellon Foundation.

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