Religion Department

Susan Ackerman receives award for "outstanding teaching of undergraduates"

Congratulations to Susan Ackerman '80, Preston H. Kelsey Professor in Religion, who was just presented with the Elizabeth Howland Hand-Otis Norton Pierce Award for a Faculty Member Who is an Outstanding Teacher of Undergraduates by the Faculty of Arts & Sciences. Read more here.

Zahra Ayubi receives Dean of the Faculty Mentoring Award

Assistant Professor of Religion Zahra Ayubi was recently honored with a Dean of the Faculty Mentoring Award for 2016-2017 for her outstanding work as a mentor of Dartmouth students. The award is funded and supported by the Provost and the Mellon Foundation.

Devin Singh awarded First Book Grant by Louisville Institute

Assistant Professor Devin Singh has been awarded a First Book Grant by The Louisville Institute, which supports scholars from underrepresented communities whose project contributes to the study of Christianity in North America. Singh will be granted a one-year faculty leave to complete work on his first book, God's Coin: Theology, Politics, and Monetary Economy. Singh's project explores the monetary logic at work in Christian doctrine and, as such, contributes to understandings of the American prosperity gospel, Christian support of corporate America, and American constructive theology that critiques the economy. The Louisville Institute is funded by the Religion Division of the Lilly Endowment and is based at the Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, Louisville, KY.

 

Tracing the Roots of Africa's Many Indigenous Religions

Tracing the Roots of Africa’s Many Indigenous Religions

 from Dartmouth Now, February 27, 2017,  by Charlotte Albright

 

For over 40 years, Associate Professor Robert Baum has shuttled between the U.S. and West Africa, learning and writing about religious prophets in rural southern Senegal. Now, with a senior faculty grant and a Wilson Faculty Research Fellowship, he will embark on a huge undertaking: writing the first continent-wide history of African religion, with a focus on indigenous religions.

Religion Department opposes U.S. Executive Order

We, the members of the Dartmouth College Religion Department, voice our strong opposition to the US Executive Order, “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States,” issued on January 27, 2017. This Executive Order, among other things, suspends the entry of permanent residents, refugees, immigrants, students, visitors, researchers and nonimmigrant citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen into the United States for the next ninety days, and possibly for a longer period still. The Executive Order also indicates that additional countries may be recommended for similar treatment, and that members of a particular religion may be banned.

Dr. Martin Luthur King, Jr., was a mensch, says Susannah Heschel

In an interview for Public Radio International, just aired on WNYC, Religion Professor Susannah Heschel (also Chair of the Jewish Studies Program at Dartmouth), who met Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., several times, recalls that, “He was always so gentle and kind and friendly to me.” And in an article in the January 16, 2017, issue of Haaretz, the oldest daily newspaper of Israel, "How John Lewis Became a Hero for American Jews," Professor Heschel, whose father was a rabbi who marched with King, tells how the Hebrew Bible inspired civil rights activists in the ‘60s.

Randall Balmer on Politics and the Pulpit

In an opinion piece in the Sunday, October 30, Valley News, Professor Randall Balmer observes that "leaders of the Religious Right in recent years...have been pushing for a repeal of the Johnson Amendment [a provision in the tax code that prohibits tax-exempt organizations from openly supporting political candidates, passed by Congress in 1954 and named for Lyndon Johnson, then a U.S. senator]." The Religious Right argues that "pastors should be able to make political endorsements from the pulpit without jeopardinzing their churches' tax exemptions [and]the fact that they cannot now do so...represents an infringement on their religious freedom." Balmer argues, however, that "the Johnson Amendment is a good idea and should not be repealed.

Susannah Heschel presented with prestigious Moses Mendelssohn Award

Susannah Heschel, the Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies, has just been presented with the Leo Baeck Institute's prestigious Moses Mendelssohn Award for her "outstanding scholarly contributions" to the study of German-Jewish culture. "It's a great honor to receive an award for my scholarship from colleagues in my field," she says. "It's wonderful." At the September 25 award ceremony in New York, she gave the 59th Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture, "The Other in the Mirror: Jewish Interpretations of Christian and Islamic Origins," focussing on the work of pioneering 19th-century scholars Abraham Geiger and Heinrich Graetz. Read more in the Dartmouth News.

Pages